No, not me. As I was loping around Twin Lakes, on the east side across from Ursuline, I wondered when the marathoners would appear.  I figured I’d put something up encouraging the use of this trail for that race.

It’s simple really. When I last trained for a marathon, I did three twenty-milers. One on the roads up to White Plains and back. Once at the Rockies. Once on the Twin Lakes/Nature Study lollipop course. This post relates to the latter two.  With the caveat that I find it difficult to go “easy” on a trail since the terrain requires more than simply cruising along. Although that may be me.

As to the Rockies, I strongly recommend doing some long stuff there. Because of the unavoidable hills, maintaining a solid pace over 20 miles means getting unavoidable strength-work.

As to Twin Lakes/Nature Study, I refer to the lollipop as a loop of the lake and then the stretch up-and-back to Weaver Street. I figure it as about 4.6 miles. Do that 4 times plus a loop of the lake and you have your 20. You can also compare times for the 4.6 miles to see if, as you want, each loop is a wee bit faster than the one before. But I found that as I tired little irregularities in the course — small rocks and roots — that I barely notice when fresh become obstacles, so bear that in mind. (Also, because of its particular demands, I would not recommend doing a long run that includes Leatherstocking. Part of a long run is to develop a rhythm and to avoid overheating and I believe Leatherstocking compromises those objectives.

The main reason I suggest this, though, is the practical side. The 4.6 miles is perfectly set-up for getting water and gels without having to carry them.  While in the race itself one will take water more frequently, I subscribe to the idea that increasing the strain by pushing considerably longer between fluids (but not too much) facilitates the whole stress/recover principle. I simply parked in the stables parking lot off California — you could as easily park on Weaver by the entrance — placed a water bottle and gels on my car and stopped at the end of each loop for maybe 10 seconds.

I’m no marathon expert. I know people who have done more in a month than the two I’ve done in my life. The aforementioned runs were solo efforts and I encourage people getting together in groups (provided their paces are close enough) and I’ve seen such groups on various trails. For those in the northern part of Westchester, there’s a page by the Leatherman’s folks of weekly runs in various places. And I encourage using the WestchesterTrails Facebook page for that purpose. On raceday each of us is on her own. So I think it makes sense to at least once do a long run as a solo effort, starting comfortably and gaining pace, and confidence, as fatigue starts building.

 

Advertisements