On Friday, Matt Tegenkamp became the third American to break 13 in the 5000, a week after Ritz became the second (and broke Bob Kennedy’s American Record). Teg’s 12:58.56 puts him third on the US list (after Ritz’s 12:56.27 and Kennedy’s 12:58.21). With Todd Williams, Kennedy was a breathe of life in American distance running in those days, taking the lead with 800 to go in the Atlanta 5000 before finishing sixth.

This race was quite different from Ritz’s, although they both lost to Kenensia Bekele. Ritz ran very evenly and picked off runners throughout. Teg was in the mix, the eighth of eight guys until Kenny B. opened up a gap. Unlike the week before in Zurich, however, Kenny B. came back to the pack, and Teg and seven others were right in it at the bell.

Bekele opened up and won, and Teg held on for seventh. He was happy:

Julie has a nice post, The sub-13:00 love train, on it.

    I was also reminded of an article from Matt Fitzgerald in Running Times late last year, How Records Are Broken, which examined the forces that push records downward and what everyday runners can learn from them. The gist being: While we hobby runners may not break any world, national or age group records, breaking our own personal records in a regular and dramatic fashion is a worthy goal — and an achievable one.

Unfortunately, I won’t be stepping aboard any time soon.

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